Renowned    author    Giano    Cromley    has    written    so    many    wonderful,    spiritual    and powerful   stories   and   essays   that   have   captivated   a   lot   of   readers   around   the   USA. Originally   he   is   from   Billings,   Montana   now   he   lives   in   Chicago,   Illinois.   In   this insightful   interview,   the   author   Giano   Cromley   gives   insight   into   his   background   as   a writer, the inspiration behind his books, and tells what's next. JBN: In one sentence, what is your book What We Build Upon the Ruins about? Giano   Cromley:   I t's   a   collection   of   stories   that all   deal   with   people's   struggles   to   move   on   from their problems, to grow past their tragedies. JBN: What inspired you to write this book? Giano   Cromley:   Writing   short   stories   has   never been    my    primary    preoccupation    as    a    writer. Typically,   I'll   sit   down   to   write   a   story   in   between larger   projects   like   novels.   Slowly,   over   several years,   I've   accumulated   enough   stories   to   turn into   an   entire   collection.   So   I   don't   think   any   one thing   in   particular   inspired   me   to   write   this   book, just patience and perseverance. JBN:   What   was   the   time   frame   for   writing this book? Giano     Cromley:     The     oldest     story     in     this collection,   I   wrote   the   first   draft   of   back   in   1997.   So   I've   been   working   on   this   collection   -- off and on -- for nearly twenty years. JBN: What Biggest learning experience with What We Build Upon the Ruins? Giano   Cromley:   My   editor   was   fairly   insistent   that   I   not   include   one   particular   story   in   this   collection.   It's   a   story   I'm   quite   proud   of,   but he   did   not   believe   that   it   fit   with   the   overall   themes   and   ideas   represented   in   the   collection. At   the   time,   I   was   somewhat   miffed   by   the advice,   but   in   retrospect,   now,   I   can   see   that   the   story   in   question   would   have   been   a   disruption   to   the   collection's   overall   cohesion.   It was the right decision, even though I didn't think so at the time. JBN: Where do you write from? Giano   Cromley:   I   write   almost   everything   longhand   first.   I   work   from   home,   and   I   sit at   a   desk   that's   very   small,   with   no   room   for   a   computer   so   I   limit   my   access   to online   distractions.   Once   I've   gotten   the   first   draft   written   out,   I'll   type   it   into   my computer and go electronically from there. JBN: What kind of writing, if any, were you doing before the books? Giano   Cromley:    I've   always   been   writing. And   I've   always   been   writing   fiction,   from as   early   as   I   can   remember.   Back   then,   I   wrote   simply   because   I   liked   to   tell   stories. And   my   audience   was   myself.   If   I   found   the   story   interesting,   I   figured   it   must   be pretty good. JBN:       In       your       blog       My       First       Devastating       Writing       Workshop - cromley.html?m=1 )you   talk   about   the   most   painful   your   writing   experience. Tell me about a proud experience you’ve had with your story and readers? Giano   Cromley:   The   proudest   experiences   I've   had   as   a   writer   have   come   when someone   I   don't   know   reaches   out   to   tell   me   they   enjoyed   my   book.   Friends   and family   giving   compliments   is   great,   but   there's   something   truly   special   about   a compliment   that   comes   from   someone   who   has   not   obligation   to   be   nice   to   you.   If you   ever   read   a   book   and   you   really   enjoyed   it,   reach   out   to   that   author   somehow   -- either   through   email   or   Twitter   --   and   let   them   know.   I   guarantee   you   will   make   their day, and maybe their week. JBN:   What   has   been   the   biggest   surprise   or   learning   experience   you’ve   seen through the process of seeing your books get published? Giano   Cromley:   Probably   the   biggest   surprise   I   received   was   that   publishing   a book   is   almost   as   much   work   as   writing   it.   I   always   figured   once   a   book   got   accepted   for   publication,   I   could   just   sit   back   and   enjoy   the process.   But   that's   not   the   case.   It   takes   a   lot   of   work   and   collaboration   to   edit,   design,   and   promote   a   book.   Even   when   you're   working with   a   good   team   of   people,   the   author   really   does   have   to   do   a   lot   of   "non-writing"   work,   which   is   something   that   takes   a   while   to learn.   I   knew   nothing   about   this   when   my   first   book   came   out,   but   I   learned   a   lot   and   it's   been   much   easier   this   time   around   with   my second book. JBN: Looking back, what did you do write that helped you break in? Giano   Cromley:   I   wrote   a   lot   of   short   stories   that   never   got   accepted   anywhere.   But   I   learned   a   lot   from   those   failed   experiments.   My first   piece   I   ever   got   accepted   for   publication   was   a   nonfiction   essay   about   professional   line-sitters   in   Washington,   DC.   It   was   called   "A Day in the Life of Democracy," and I'm still quite proud of it. I believe that essay opened a lot of doors for me as a writer. JBN: Do you feel support from people who is around you? Giano   Cromley:   Absolutely.   I   feel   a   ton   of   support   from   those   around   me,   particularly   my   wife.   She's   the   one   who   sees   the   dark moods   and   the   despair.   It's   not   a   pretty   sight.   I   don't   think   anyone   could   do   this   without   one   hundred   percent   support   from   the   people around them. JBN: What was the book that most influenced your life — and why? What books are on your nightstand? Giano   Cromley:   That   is   an   incredibly   difficult   question,   since   so   many   books   have   influenced   me.   If   pressed,   however,   I'd   have   to   say it   was   Ernest   Hemingway's   The   Sun Also   Rises.   I   read   that   book   at   a   time   in   my   life   when   my   exposure   to   most   books   was   limited   to assignments   for   school. And   suddenly,   here   was   a   book   that   was   interesting   and   talked   about   characters   I   cared   about.   It   spoke   to   me in a way nothing before it had. And it made me realize that it was possible to write the kind of books I wanted to read. JBN: What’s next? Giano   Cromley:    Right   now,   I'm   working   on   a   sequel   to   the   my   first   novel,   The   Last   Good   Halloween.   This   new   book   is   titled   The Prince   of   Infinite   Space.   I'm   fixing   up   some   edits   from   my   publisher   right   now,   so   I   hope   to   have   it   released   perhaps   by   the   end   of   the year. JBN: Give please your readers three "Good to Know" facts about you. Giano Cromley: 1. I'm left-handed. 2. I've written four novels that were never published. 3. I get a lot of inspiration for stories from reading online product reviews. Website:   http://www.gianocromley.com/
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  Giano Cromley: The proudest experiences I've had as a writer have come when someone I don't know reaches out to tell me they enjoyed my book
Interview
Renowned      author      Giano Cromley      has      written      so many     wonderful,     spiritual and     powerful     stories     and essays   that   have   captivated a   lot   of   readers   around   the USA.    Originally    he    is    from Billings,    Montana    now    he lives   in   Chicago,   Illinois.   In this   insightful   interview,   the author   Giano   Cromley   gives insight   into   his   background as    a    writer,    the    inspiration behind   his   books,   and   tells what's next. JBN:   In   one   sentence,   what is   your   book   What   We   Build Upon the Ruins about? Giano    Cromley:    I t's    a    collection    of    stories    that    all    deal    with people's   struggles   to   move   on   from   their   problems,   to   grow   past their tragedies. JBN: What inspired you to write this book? Giano   Cromley:   Writing   short   stories   has   never   been   my   primary preoccupation   as   a   writer.   Typically,   I'll   sit   down   to   write   a   story   in between   larger   projects   like   novels.   Slowly,   over   several   years, I've   accumulated   enough   stories   to   turn   into   an   entire   collection. So    I    don't    think    any one   thing   in   particular inspired    me    to    write this         book,         just patience                  and perseverance. JBN:    What    was    the time        frame        for writing this book? Giano   Cromley:   The oldest     story     in     this collection,   I   wrote   the first    draft    of    back    in 1997.    So    I've    been working        on        this collection   --   off   and   on --    for    nearly    twenty years. JBN:    What    Biggest learning    experience with   What   We   Build Upon the Ruins? Giano   Cromley:   My   editor   was   fairly   insistent   that   I   not   include one   particular   story   in   this   collection.   It's   a   story   I'm   quite   proud   of, but   he   did   not   believe   that   it   fit   with   the   overall   themes   and   ideas represented   in   the   collection.   At   the   time,   I   was   somewhat   miffed by   the   advice,   but   in   retrospect,   now,   I   can   see   that   the   story   in question   would   have   been   a   disruption   to   the   collection's   overall cohesion.   It   was   the   right   decision,   even   though   I   didn't   think   so   at the time. JBN: Where do you write from? Giano   Cromley:   I   write   almost   everything   longhand   first.   I   work from   home,   and   I   sit   at   a   desk   that's   very   small,   with   no   room   for   a computer   so   I   limit   my   access   to   online   distractions.   Once   I've gotten   the   first   draft   written   out,   I'll   type   it   into   my   computer   and   go electronically from there. JBN:   What   kind   of   writing,   if   any,   were   you   doing   before   the books? Giano   Cromley:    I've   always   been   writing.   And   I've   always   been writing   fiction,   from   as   early   as   I   can   remember.   Back   then,   I   wrote simply    because    I    liked    to    tell    stories.   And    my    audience    was myself.   If   I   found   the   story   interesting,   I   figured   it   must   be   pretty good. JBN:   In   your   blog   My   First   Devastating   Writing   Workshop - time-giano-cromley.html?m=1 )you      talk      about      the      most painful    your    writing    experience.    Tell    me    about    a    proud experience you’ve had with your story and readers? Giano   Cromley:   The   proudest   experiences   I've   had   as   a   writer have   come   when   someone   I   don't   know   reaches   out   to   tell   me they   enjoyed   my   book.   Friends   and   family   giving   compliments   is great,   but   there's   something   truly   special   about   a   compliment   that comes   from   someone   who   has   not   obligation   to   be   nice   to   you.   If you    ever    read a   book   and   you really     enjoyed it,   reach   out   to that          author somehow         -- either     through email   or   Twitter --   and   let   them know.                I guarantee    you will    make    their day,              and maybe         their week. JBN:         What has    been    the b    i    g    g    e    s    t      surprise         or l   e   a   r   n   i   n   g       you’ve       seen through       the process         of seeing       your books          get published? Giano   Cromley:   Probably   the   biggest   surprise   I   received   was that   publishing   a   book   is   almost   as   much   work   as   writing   it.   I always   figured   once   a   book   got   accepted   for   publication,   I   could just   sit   back   and   enjoy   the   process.   But   that's   not   the   case.   It takes   a   lot   of   work   and   collaboration   to   edit,   design,   and   promote a   book.   Even   when   you're   working   with   a   good   team   of   people, the   author   really   does   have   to   do   a   lot   of   "non-writing"   work,   which is   something   that   takes   a   while   to   learn.   I   knew   nothing   about   this when   my   first   book   came   out,   but   I   learned   a   lot   and   it's   been much easier this time around with my second book. JBN:   Looking   back,   what   did   you   do   write   that   helped   you break in? Giano    Cromley:    I    wrote    a    lot    of    short    stories    that    never    got accepted    anywhere.    But    I    learned    a    lot    from    those    failed experiments.   My   first   piece   I   ever   got   accepted   for   publication   was a   nonfiction   essay   about   professional   line-sitters   in   Washington, DC.   It   was   called   "A   Day   in   the   Life   of   Democracy,"   and   I'm   still quite   proud   of   it.   I   believe   that   essay   opened   a   lot   of   doors   for   me as a writer. JBN: Do you feel support from people who is around you? Giano   Cromley:   Absolutely.   I   feel   a   ton   of   support   from   those around   me,   particularly   my   wife.   She's   the   one   who   sees   the   dark moods   and   the   despair.   It's   not   a   pretty   sight.   I   don't   think   anyone could    do    this    without    one    hundred    percent    support    from    the people around them. JBN:   What   was   the   book   that   most   influenced   your   life   —   and why? What books are on your nightstand? Giano   Cromley:    That   is   an   incredibly   difficult   question,   since   so many   books   have   influenced   me.   If   pressed,   however,   I'd   have   to say   it   was   Ernest   Hemingway's   The   Sun   Also   Rises.   I   read   that book   at   a   time   in   my   life   when   my   exposure   to   most   books   was limited   to   assignments   for   school. And   suddenly,   here   was   a   book that   was   interesting   and   talked   about   characters   I   cared   about.   It spoke   to   me   in   a   way   nothing   before   it   had.   And   it   made   me realize   that   it   was   possible   to   write   the   kind   of   books   I   wanted   to read. JBN: What’s next? Giano   Cromley:    Right   now,   I'm   working   on   a   sequel   to   the   my first   novel,   The   Last   Good   Halloween.   This   new   book   is   titled   The Prince    of    Infinite    Space.    I'm    fixing    up    some    edits    from    my publisher   right   now,   so   I   hope   to   have   it   released   perhaps   by   the end of the year. JBN:   Give   please   your   readers   three   "Good   to   Know"   facts about you. Giano Cromley: 1. I'm left-handed. 2. I've written four novels that were never published. 3.   I   get   a   lot   of   inspiration   for   stories   from   reading   online   product reviews. Website:   http://www.gianocromley.com/
Johnson’s Billings News
Interview
Hosted by Johnson Computing
They are read.  We are Quoted!!!
  Giano Cromley: The proudest experiences I've had as a writer have come when someone I don't know reaches out to tell me they enjoyed my book