Few days ago in The Billings Public Library, Lisa Mills of the University of Montana brought us for a free photographic journey to Asian elephant country to discover how tea plantations are working to create solutions for the ongoing human/animal conflicts. The Project is young, only 2 years old but already very successful. And have a wonderful story about a participant from the Indian side who gave his property for the wild life. The government of India remained indifferent to his deed. But one day this place will become a national park and his grandchildren will be proud of him. - What the impact of tea on elephants? Lisa Mills: There are several things: loss of habitat, human-elephant conflict, poisoning, ditch hazards and obstacles to movement, electrocution. For example electric fencing, if not installed properly for safety, can be especially dangerous as an electrocution hazard for elephants. The electric traps can make elephants very upset and they can react. Attack human or their property. - How you can describe your mission? Lisa Mills: We try to help people and elephants to establish relationships in which both parties are in safety. We have the team we put together. if some of the owner of tea plantation wants to be elephant friendly we go to them, we tell them about the standards that we develop to remove some things like electrocution or potential for poisoning. They have to change these. They have to have habit how available elephants move through. - Are they pretty receptive to these ideas? Lisa Mills: Yes, because the getting more money out of this. We give them dollars extra per kg of tea they sell and it is very big deal in India. Of cause we control that they keep all the standards about elephant safety. And then we make everything in way that tea money goes to community in the area around elephant friendly plantation to help people who suffered from human-elephant conflicts. We help restore the destroyed houses with this money. And also, if a man in the family died during a clash with an elephant, then we financially support his wife and children. For information on how to become a Certified Elephant Friendly Tea plantation or source certified tea contact: lisa.mills@umontana.edu Also must visit https://elephantfriendlytea.wordpress.com Nota Bene! Asian elephants are a wide-ranging species with an important ecological role. As mega-herbivores, elephants feed on a large variety of plants and disperse seeds throughout the forest in their waste, also known as dung. Asian elephants are endangered, primarily due to habitat loss. Despite the conversion of prime elephant habitat for human settlements and agricultural uses, elephants travel along ancient migratory routes. In Assam, India, this engrained habit brings elephants in close contact with people, especially around tea plantations and their surrounding communities. Shrinking habitat in the region leaves elephants with little choice for alternative routes to avoid areas of ever-expanding human development.
Johnson’s Billings News
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Lisa Mills about Certified Elephant Friendly Tea
Elephants
Few days ago in The Billings Public Library, Lisa Mills of the University of Montana brought us for a free photographic journey to Asian elephant country to discover how tea plantations are working to create solutions for the ongoing human/animal conflicts. The Project is young, only 2 years old but already very successful. And have a wonderful story about a participant from the Indian side who gave his property for the wild life. The government of India remained indifferent to his deed. But one day this place will become a national park and his grandchildren will be proud of him. - What the impact of tea on elephants? Lisa Mills: There are several things: loss of habitat, human- elephant conflict, poisoning, ditch hazards and obstacles to movement, electrocution. For example electric fencing, if not installed properly for safety, can be especially dangerous as an electrocution hazard for elephants. The electric traps can make elephants very upset and they can react. Attack human or their property. - How you can describe your mission? Lisa Mills: We try to help people and elephants to establish relationships in which both parties are in safety. We have the team we put together. if some of the owner of tea plantation wants to be elephant friendly we go to them, we tell them about the standards that we develop to remove some things like electrocution or potential for poisoning. They have to change these. They have to have habit how available elephants move through. - Are they pretty receptive to these ideas? Lisa Mills: Yes, because the getting more money out of this. We give them dollars extra per kg of tea they sell and it is very big deal in India. Of cause we control that they keep all the standards about elephant safety. And then we make everything in way that tea money goes to community in the area around elephant friendly plantation to help people who suffered from human-elephant conflicts. We help restore the destroyed houses with this money. And also, if a man in the family died during a clash with an elephant, then we financially support his wife and children. For information on how to become a Certified Elephant Friendly Tea plantation or source certified tea contact: lisa.mills@umontana.edu Also must visit https://elephantfriendlytea.wordpress.com Nota Bene! Asian elephants are a wide-ranging species with an important ecological role. As mega-herbivores, elephants feed on a large variety of plants and disperse seeds throughout the forest in their waste, also known as dung. Asian elephants are endangered, primarily due to habitat loss. Despite the conversion of prime elephant habitat for human settlements and agricultural uses, elephants travel along ancient migratory routes. In Assam, India, this engrained habit brings elephants in close contact with people, especially around tea plantations and their surrounding communities. Shrinking habitat in the region leaves elephants with little choice for alternative routes to avoid areas of ever-expanding human development.
Johnson’s Billings News
Elephants
Hosted by Johnson Computing
They are read.  We are Quoted!!!
Lisa Mills about Certified Elephant Friendly Tea