Julia Johnson Editor in Chief, journalist, blogger The British author Kazuo Ishiguro has been named winner of the 2017 Nobel prize in literature. He was praised by the Swedish Academy for his 'novels of great emotional force', which it said had 'uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world'. The author said that in this age of fake news, he initially didn't believe he had won, and said the world has entered a 'very uncertain time'. His most famous novels, The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, were adapted into acclaimed films and he was made an OBE in 1995 “If you mix Jane Austen and Franz Kafka then you have Kazuo Ishiguro in a nutshell, but you have to add a little bit of Marcel Proust into the mix,” said Sara Danius , the p e r m a n e n t secretary of the Swedish Academy and I agree with her. I remember when I bought his first book. I mean MY first book written by him. It cost 45 ghn (name of our local money) and was expensive. I studied in university and was big fan of Japan literature. A Pale View of Hills was name of story. This is a beautiful novel that calls for patient and careful reading. I admire the way it's constructed. Ishiguro is a master storyteller and has an eloquent way with words. This novel was lovely, absorbing, and immensely readable. It just asked more questions than it answered. And for someone that likes their mysteries nicely resolved with a bow on top, this was a bit frustrating. A Pale View of Hills tells the story of Etsuko, a Japanese woman now living in England. Dealing with the recent suicide of her oldest daughter, Etsuko attempts to reconstruct events and figure out what happened by dwelling on her past and the time when she was living in war-torn Nagasaki. She recounts being pregnant with her daughter, living with a cold, domineering husband, and her strange friendship with a mysterious woman and her young daughter. Strange things happen, not everything is as it appears, and the past and the present blur until they are indistinguishable. By the end of the novel, few things are answered and nothing is certain. On the flip side, the book does make you think and I'm fairly sure that readers will all have different theories and interpretations of the novel's meaning and events. After that book I read The Remains of the Day. That book tastes like dry red wine with posh and sorrow. And than was An Artist of the Floating World. In that book Kazuo Ishiguro offers readers of the English language an authentic look at postwar Japan, "a floating world" of changing cultural behaviors, shifting societal patterns and troubling questions. Just now I'am very happy that Nobel prize got someone who is real interesting and decent author. Someone who can capture with his story. Absolutely must read that fall!
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“I hought it was a hoax'” - Kazuo Ishiguro and Nobel prize 2017
Julia Johnson Editor in Chief, journalist, blogger The British author Kazuo Ishiguro has been named winner of the 2017 Nobel prize in literature. He was praised by the Swedish Academy for his 'novels of great emotional force', which it said had 'uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world'. The author said that in this age of fake news, he initially didn't believe he had won, and said the world has entered a 'very uncertain time'. His most famous novels, The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go, were adapted into acclaimed films and he was made an OBE in 1995 “If you mix Jane Austen and Franz Kafka then you have Kazuo Ishiguro in a nutshell, but you have to add a little bit of Marcel Proust into the mix,” said Sara Danius , the permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy and I agree with her. I remember when I bought his first book. I mean MY first book written by him. It cost 45 ghn (name of our local money) and was expensive. I studied in university and was big fan of Japan literature. A Pale View of Hills was name of story. This is a beautiful novel that calls for patient and careful reading. I admire the way it's constructed. Ishiguro is a master storyteller and has an eloquent way with words. This novel was lovely, absorbing, and immensely readable. It just asked more questions than it answered. And for someone that likes their mysteries nicely resolved with a bow on top, this was a bit frustrating. A Pale View of Hills tells the story of Etsuko, a Japanese woman now living in England. Dealing with the recent suicide of her oldest daughter, Etsuko attempts to reconstruct events and figure out what happened by dwelling on her past and the time when she was living in war-torn Nagasaki. She recounts being pregnant with her daughter, living with a cold, domineering husband, and her strange friendship with a mysterious woman and her young daughter. Strange things happen, not everything is as it appears, and the past and the present blur until they are indistinguishable. By the end of the novel, few things are answered and nothing is certain. On the flip side, the book does make you think and I'm fairly sure that readers will all have different theories and interpretations of the novel's meaning and events. After that book I read The Remains of the Day. That book tastes like dry red wine with posh and sorrow. And than was An Artist of the Floating World. In that book Kazuo Ishiguro offers readers of the English language an authentic look at postwar Japan, "a floating world" of changing cultural behaviors, shifting societal patterns and troubling questions. Just now I'am very happy that Nobel prize got someone who is real interesting and decent author. Someone who can capture with his story. Absolutely must read that fall!
Johnson’s Billings News
JJ’s blog
Hosted by Johnson Computing
They are read.  We are Quoted!!!
“I hought it was a hoax'” - Kazuo Ishiguro and Nobel prize 2017